Enjoy a Panoramic Tour of Arizona’s Natural Grandeur: Hike the Woodchute Mountain Wilderness, Jerome

With rising temperatures and record breaking heat in the Arizona desert, the summer months are the perfect time for heading up north to higher elevations, 7000ft or higher, where the temperatures are cooler and you can get outdoors again to enjoy more of the natural beauty and diversity that is state of Arizona and its terrain. For a quick and easy summer day trip and a quiet, less crowded, easy-moderate hike with breathtaking panoramic views of Arizona, I recommend hiking the Woodchute Trail, in the Woodchute Mountain Wilderness, near Jerome.

Starting out from Phoenix, you’ll want to take I-17 north till you reach the exit for Route 260 West, Cottonwood/ Clarkdale & Jerome. We started out around 8:30 am on a weekday so the traffic and road conditions were pretty good. We noticed there seemed to be a lot of Arizona Highway patrol cars everywhere so be very careful to watch your speed. After a few short stops along the way, we arrived in the small town of Cottonwood at around 10:30am, made a left onto route 89A South, and followed the signs for Jerome. On 89A South, you’ll begin a winding ascent up in elevation from 3000 feet up all the way up to 5000 feet, with some really beautiful views of the surrounding Verde Valley behind you.

We arrived in the historic town of Jerome and after a short break to stretch our legs, we continued on our journey heading south on 89A, now called the “Mingus Mountain Scenic Byway”. With many tight twisting, hairpin curves and a winding ascent up in elevation now from 5000 feet to 7000 feet, the views along the way are absolutely spectacular! This very scenic drive from Jerome to the top of Mingus Mountain is roughly about 8 miles. Once you reach the top you’ll see a sign for “Mingus Recreation Area” off to the left. Turn right, then drive a short ways until you come to FR 106, then take that for about a mile until you come to the Woodchute Trail. The road is all dirt but good and passable for regular vehicles if you take it slow. However, if you have a high clearance 2WD or a 4WD, that’d be better.

After arriving at the trailhead by noon we set out on our hike on the Woodchute Trail. It was a really nice, quiet and serene hike which wound through thick ponderosa pine forest. The elevation ranged from 7000 feet to roughly 7600 feet with only a moderate, gentle climb. The temperature was roughly in the low 80’s with a light breeze to keep you cool. Starting out on the trail we noticed some signs of a burn, though not too bad. What I liked best about this hike was the spectacular panoramic mountain top views it offered. Only a short ways down the trail and off to your right you’ll see the view down below of 89A winding up to the top of Mingus Mountain, but as well, looking up and beyond you’ll see amazing views of the entire surrounding geographic area of Arizona such as the Verde Valley, the Red Rocks, the Mogollon Rim and off to the distance almost dead north you’ll even see the tops of the San Francisco Peaks! Then a little ways further down the trail and off to your left you’ll reach another ridge where in the distance you’ll now see amazing views of the Prescott and Chino Valleys, making it almost a completely panoramic tour of the northern state of Arizona!

We continued hiking the Woodchute Trail for several miles then returned back to our car by about 2:30pm to head back down to Jerome again via 89A. Once we arrived, we had a little time to spare so we decided to stop in at the very well known “Giselle’s Bakery” on Main Street and after getting some wonderful pastries to take home with us, we then drove up the street to check out the famous, “Jerome Grand Hotel”, which they say is Arizona’s most haunted hotel. It’s a very beautiful and historic hotel that has a lot of reports of paranormal activity and was even visited recently by the Ghost Adventures paranormal investigators team from the Travel Channel which aired earlier this year. We stopped in for an hour or so and ordered a nice cold locally brewed micro beer in their restaurant & lounge called “The Asylum”. We did not see any ghosts while we were there but were told that if you really want to see ghosts, you can come back anytime and they’ll take you on a real live Ghost Hunting Tour of your own!

After a quick tour of the first floor and main lobby of the hotel we left Jerome around 5pm to return back to Phoenix by 7pm. We really enjoyed this trip to the Woodchute Mountain Wilderness and our visit to the old historic (and haunted) town of Jerome. It was a really nice, quick and easy summer day trip and hike that’s not far from Phoenix at a high elevation of 7000+ feet and with temperatures perfect for getting outdoors. Plus, this very easy-moderate hike had gorgeous scenery and views that will absolutely take your breath away. I highly recommend it. We look forward to returning again soon in the near future and possibly staying a night or two at the haunted Jerome Grand Hotel!

Laura K. Halik is a writer and published author with over 20 years experience of outdoors travel throughout the state of Arizona and the western region. She is passionate for nature, the outdoors, travel and adventure. Laura enjoys hiking, canyoneering, white water rafting, kayaking, scuba diving, snorkeling, writing, and photography. She is also a co-hiking leader and organizer in a hiking and outdoors adventure club for advanced and experienced hikers.

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An Arizona Canyoneering Adventure

If you live in here in Arizona then you know that without good A/C and a swimming pool, it’s just too hot! Even though temperatures may be sizzling here in the desert region of the state, you can still get out and enjoy nature and the outdoors. More any other state in the U.S., Arizona is famous for its many beautiful canyons and gorges, many of which can be reached in as little as a few hours drive from the Phoenix metropolitan area. If you’re ready for a real outdoors adventure, and a great summer day trip & hike into one of Arizona’s gorgeous mountain canyons, then check out Christopher Creek’s Box Canyon & the Ellison Creek Cascades, and discover the adventure of Arizona Canyoneering!

Through a local hiking group I joined called the TLC Hiking Group, led and organized by Eric Kinneman, I saw that there was a really interesting water hike scheduled, rated easy to moderate, which sounded like a lot of fun. Though I have hiked and camped in Arizona’s beautiful Mogollon Rim area for many years and recently visited the Christopher Creek area a couple months ago too, I had never heard of Box Canyon or the Ellison Creek Cascades before. But I always enjoy hiking, getting outdoors and exploring new places to go in Arizona so I was excited to sign up for this day hike.

I met up with Eric Kinneman and the TLC Hiking Group early on a Saturday morning, and by 7:45 am, we left the Fort McDowell Casino, heading north on Rt 87, aka the Beeline Highway. The drive up on Route 87 to Payson is one of my personal favorites. Absolutely gorgeous mountain scenery all the way! We arrived in Payson in about 1.5 hours, then made a right onto Route 260 east and drove 30 minutes and another 19 miles to Christopher Creek, arriving by 9:30am. Because there was no official parking for this hike and with the road construction that was going on that day, Eric advised us to park at the Christopher Creek Campground’s day use area. So for a small fee of $6, which was strictly enforced, and with ample space available, we all parked our cars there.

Starting out from the Christopher Creek Campground, we hiked about a mile along the shoulder on the south side of Route 260, where just next door to the right of the Boy Scout Camp, we passed through a fence, collected the group, then set out on our descent down into Box Canyon. The trail was not real well marked at the beginning but we quickly found our bearings then trekked our way through the beautiful pines and forest vegetation and after only a short ways, maybe about a mile, we arrived at the top of Box Canyon. Wow, what an incredible view looking down into the canyon. Absolutely gorgeous! After stopping to take a few photos, we then followed the trail steeply down to the creek bottom below.

Once everyone had made it safely to the water’s edge at the top of the creek, Eric quickly jumped into the water and began guiding the group down stream, swimming and scrambling from one waterfall and pool to another until roughly about 1/4 to 1/3 mile down they reached a 35 foot waterfall which could only be safely attempted by rappeling. With this being my first experience “canyoneering”, I took it at a much slower pace and lost most of the group! After taking the plunge into my first swimming hole, I found the water to be cool, but surprisingly very refreshing. So one waterfall after another, each one seeming larger than the next, I slowly kept swimming, scrambling, jumping into pool after pool, trying to see if I could reach the group. I had just jumped down a 10 foot waterfall, dropping completely into a deep pool of water, then continued on a little ways further when I started to notice feeling cold and my feet and hands feeling really numb. That’s when I knew I had reached my limit and the point where I couldn’t go on any further. Christopher Creek Gorge is a beautiful and popular place for canyoneering in Arizona because of its many small waterfalls and pools. However, be aware that the water temperature is cool, especially if you’ve been in it for awhile and if you don’t have a wet suit, getting hypothermia is a possibility and one of the hazards of canyoneering. But I made it back safely with the help of a few people along the way who helped pull me back up onto the rocks. Once I had arrived back, it only took a few minutes to warm back up in the hot sun at the top of the cliff and I was okay again.

It was by this time that Eric had returned, with the rest of the group coming in one by one behind him. After a few minutes collecting the group again, we started our hike back and arrived at the Christopher Creek Campground and our cars by 12:30-12:45pm. As soon as everyone had safely returned again, it was time to journey on to the 2nd water hike of the day, the Ellison Creek Cascades, just north east of Payson. By 1pm we got back into our cars and drove route 260 west back to Payson, then hung a right onto Route 87 north for a couple of miles until we reached the Houston Mesa Campground, then turned right onto Houston Mesa Road, aka FR 199.

It was a very beautiful and scenic drive out Houston Mesa Road, though some signs were still evident of the devastating Water Wheel Fire in 2009. It was about 8 miles later and shortly after crossing the East Verde River that we turned off into a small parking area on the right at the Cold Springs Campground. We parked, got out there, passed through the gate and began the short hike, roughly about a mile down the dirt road trail, FR 420, then hung a right down into Ellison Creek. The views along FR 420 of the surrounding Tonto National Forest area were really spectacular!

The temperatures on this August day were by now pretty warm, about the low 90’s, so there were a lot of people already there at Ellison Creek as it’s a very popular and well known swimming hole during the summer months. Once down at the creek, I hopped across the rocks and boulders until I caught sight of Eric and the group at the swimming hole next to the falls. Everyone that day was having a great time because next to the water fall there was a large tree that had steps carved into it like stairs so that you could climb up and jump off into the water pool below. Wow, that looked like fun!

After spending a couple of afternoon hours relaxing and enjoying the cool water at Ellison Creek, it was time to head back home again. We started our hike at around 4pm, making the trek back up the hot dirt road but feeling much cooler and refreshed now! We returned to our cars and the parking lot by 4:30pm, drove it back to Payson, then headed on down to Phoenix where we arrived back at the Fort McDowell Casino by 6pm.

An Arizona Canyoneering Adventure: Hiking Christopher Creek’s Box Canyon and Ellison Creek Cascades

If you live in here in Arizona then you know that without good A/C and a swimming pool, it’s just too hot! Even though temperatures may be sizzling here in the desert region of the state, you can still get out and enjoy nature and the outdoors. More any other state in the U.S., Arizona is famous for its many beautiful canyons and gorges, many of which can be reached in as little as a few hours drive from the Phoenix metropolitan area. If you’re ready for a real outdoors adventure, and a great summer day trip & hike into one of Arizona’s gorgeous mountain canyons, then check out Christopher Creek’s Box Canyon & the Ellison Creek Cascades, and discover the adventure of Arizona Canyoneering!

Through a local hiking group I joined called the TLC Hiking Group, led and organized by Eric Kinneman, I saw that there was a really interesting water hike scheduled, rated easy to moderate, which sounded like a lot of fun. Though I have hiked and camped in Arizona’s beautiful Mogollon Rim area for many years and recently visited the Christopher Creek area a couple months ago too, I had never heard of Box Canyon or the Ellison Creek Cascades before. But I always enjoy hiking, getting outdoors and exploring new places to go in Arizona so I was excited to sign up for this day hike.

I met up with Eric Kinneman and the TLC Hiking Group early on a Saturday morning, and by 7:45 am, we left the Fort McDowell Casino, heading north on Rt 87, aka the Beeline Highway. The drive up on Route 87 to Payson is one of my personal favorites. Absolutely gorgeous mountain scenery all the way! We arrived in Payson in about 1.5 hours, then made a right onto Route 260 east and drove 30 minutes and another 19 miles to Christopher Creek, arriving by 9:30am. Because there was no official parking for this hike and with the road construction that was going on that day, Eric advised us to park at the Christopher Creek Campground’s day use area. So for a small fee of $6, which was strictly enforced, and with ample space available, we all parked our cars there.

Starting out from the Christopher Creek Campground, we hiked about a mile along the shoulder on the south side of Route 260, where just next door to the right of the Boy Scout Camp, we passed through a fence, collected the group, then set out on our descent down into Box Canyon. The trail was not real well marked at the beginning but we quickly found our bearings then trekked our way through the beautiful pines and forest vegetation and after only a short ways, maybe about a mile, we arrived at the top of Box Canyon. Wow, what an incredible view looking down into the canyon. Absolutely gorgeous! After stopping to take a few photos, we then followed the trail steeply down to the creek bottom below.

Once everyone had made it safely to the water’s edge at the top of the creek, Eric quickly jumped into the water and began guiding the group down stream, swimming and scrambling from one waterfall and pool to another until roughly about 1/4 to 1/3 mile down they reached a 35 foot waterfall which could only be safely attempted by rappeling. With this being my first experience “canyoneering”, I took it at a much slower pace and lost most of the group! After taking the plunge into my first swimming hole, I found the water to be cool, but surprisingly very refreshing. So one waterfall after another, each one seeming larger than the next, I slowly kept swimming, scrambling, jumping into pool after pool, trying to see if I could reach the group. I had just jumped down a 10 foot waterfall, dropping completely into a deep pool of water, then continued on a little ways further when I started to notice feeling cold and my feet and hands feeling really numb. That’s when I knew I had reached my limit and the point where I couldn’t go on any further. Christopher Creek Gorge is a beautiful and popular place for canyoneering in Arizona because of its many small waterfalls and pools. However, be aware that the water temperature is cool, especially if you’ve been in it for awhile and if you don’t have a wet suit, getting hypothermia is a possibility and one of the hazards of canyoneering. But I made it back safely with the help of a few people along the way who helped pull me back up onto the rocks. Once I had arrived back, it only took a few minutes to warm back up in the hot sun at the top of the cliff and I was okay again.

It was by this time that Eric had returned, with the rest of the group coming in one by one behind him. After a few minutes collecting the group again, we started our hike back and arrived at the Christopher Creek Campground and our cars by 12:30-12:45pm. As soon as everyone had safely returned again, it was time to journey on to the 2nd water hike of the day, the Ellison Creek Cascades, just north east of Payson. By 1pm we got back into our cars and drove route 260 west back to Payson, then hung a right onto Route 87 north for a couple of miles until we reached the Houston Mesa Campground, then turned right onto Houston Mesa Road, aka FR 199.

A Scenic Mountain Journey to the Top of Arizona: The Kachina Peaks Wilderness, Flagstaff, AZ

With sweltering heat and high triple digit temperatures in Phoenix, it’s the perfect time to head to up north to get outdoors and experience Arizona’s beautiful and lush high mountain forests and wilderness areas. For a wonderful and scenic day trip and easy hike, take a journey to the top of Arizona by hiking the Kachina Trail, in the Kachina Peaks Wilderness, Flagstaff, Arizona.

Located high up in the San Francisco peaks, sits Arizona’s tallest peak, Mt. Humphreys which rises to an elevation of 12, 643 feet which you can climb to the top of on the Mt. Humphrey’s Trail, one of the most challenging hikes in all of Arizona. However, if you’re up for more of an easier day hike instead, then I highly recommend checking out the beautiful Kachina Trail, which is also located in the Kachina Peaks Wilderness and like the Mt. Humphrey’s Trail, is also located at Arizona’s Snow Bowl Ski Resort and if you’re up for the added adventure, you can take a very scenic sky ride right up to the top of Arizona at elevation, 11,500 feet, for a spectacular and amazing panoramic view of all the surrounding Flagstaff and Kachina Peaks Wilderness area, without having to climb it yourself too!

To get to the Kachina Trail from Phoenix you’ll want to head out of town on I-17 north to Flagstaff. We left Phoenix at 9am on a Saturday morning and arrived in Flagstaff at around 11:30am. The drive from Phoenix to Flagstaff is roughly about 2.5 hours and 148 miles. Once you arrive in Flagstaff, the freeway ends and you will exit onto 89A north. Follow 89A through town till you come to route 180 north Snow Bowl Ski Resort, then make a left. You’ll take route 180 for about another 30 minutes till you reach FR 516 and the turn off for Snow Bowl Ski Resort and turn right. The drive along FR 516 is really beautiful and heavily forested as you quickly wind up in elevation from 7000 feet up to 9000 feet. Be aware though that there is little bit of road construction going but it’s not too bad. You’ll want to just take it slow and be on the lookout for wildlife because we saw a couple of deer off to the right in an open meadow area about midway.

Once you reach the lodge, on your right you will see the sign for the Kachina Trail where you’ll park in the Snow Bowl parking lot. At about 9,200 feet, the trail begins a somewhat level but rocky decent, traversing across the San Francisco Peaks through beautiful Aspens forests, winding through open meadows and offering break throughs here and there for gorgeous vistas of the surrounding Flagstaff area that are absolutely magnificent. We journeyed along on this gorgeous trail, noticing only a slight drop in elevation, about 600 feet. Although the trail is rated “easy” but due to the rocky conditions and the high level of elevation, I would actually rate it as slightly “moderate” and a good fitness hike as well.

We hiked for about 1.5 hours until we reached another grassy open meadow and forest clearing that had spectacular views. By this point, we noticed the ferns and foliage along the trail to be much higher and the trail becoming less defined so we decided to take a short break then turn around and head back to the lodge. We made the trip back and returned to our car by 3:30pm, then drove back up to the lodge and purchased tickets for $12 for the scenic sky ride trip, just making it in time too for the last lift of the day, 4pm.

The sky ride to the top was absolutely breathtaking and very relaxing too after our hike. We slowly ascended up the mountain and got off at the top, at elevation 11, 500 feet to take a few minutes to walk around. Wow, what an incredible view literally from the top of Arizona! Absolutely breathtaking! After a few minutes of taking pictures, we got back on the chair lift again and found the ride down to be a bit more nerve wracking especially if you are scared of heights! However, after only a few hair raising minutes, we calmed down again and could not help but feel so amazed and inspired by all the gorgeous scenery all around as you slowly make your way back down the mountain again. After a slow and chilly descent, we arrived back at the lodge again by 5pm and the total time for the sky ride about 1.0 hour.

That day the temperatures in Flagstaff were in the low 80’s. The weather at Snow Bowl had started out with a little bit of rain but slowly cleared up as we continued on our hike. On the trail and at elevation 9,200 feet, I’d estimate the temperatures to be in the 60’s to 70’s, and perfect for hiking too. However, from the top at 11, 500 elevation, it was considerably much cooler, with an estimated temperature I’d say in the 50’s. We were actually cold especially with the chilly breezes all the way back down. We left Snow Bowl at around 5pm and after a brief stop at the Rock Springs Café at Black Canyon City for a delicious blueberry pie and a peanut butter brownie to go, we arrived back to Phoenix by 8pm.

In all I’d say it really was a fun and very enjoyable day getting out the heat and enjoying nature and the outdoors up in the beautiful northern high country of Arizona. I would highly recommend it. For a quick, easy day trip & hike and a gorgeous mountain journey right up to the top of Arizona, you’ll want be sure to check this one out!

Laura K. Halik is a writer and published author with over 20 years experience of outdoors travel throughout the state of Arizona and the western region. She is passionate for nature, the outdoors, travel and adventure. Laura enjoys hiking, canyoneering, white water rafting, kayaking, scuba diving, snorkeling, writing, and photography. She is also a co-hiking leader and organizer in a hiking and outdoors adventure club for advanced and experienced hikers.

Visit Top American Vacation Destinations Through Travel Club Memberships

As a member of an exclusive travel club you can enjoy America’s top vacation destinations of immense natural beauty. Some of the most popular American vacation spots are mountains, beaches, and natural wonders. Americans love golf, snow skiing and water sports, coastal and inland. There are art festivals and museums, film studios and amusement and theme parks which are also hot vacation spots. The numerous mountain areas are favorite getaways for tourists in America. These areas are full of the natural beauty of rugged terrain and pristine national forests and parks which offer numerous activities such as snow skiing, hiking, shooting the rapids, golf, tennis and hot-air ballooning just to name a few that are ideal for family holidays and getaways.

Through a travel club membership you can enjoy all of these activities in 4 and 5 star resorts located for example in the Catskills, Pocono mountains, Jackson Hole Wyoming, Vail, Winterpark and Steamboat Springs, Colorado, and Gatlinburg, Tennessee. If golf is your passion, a good travel club will offer a long list of exclusive golf resorts all over the country in places like Florida, Palm Springs and Capistrano Beach, California, Hawaii and Phoenix, Arizona.

Travel club memberships should also offer a long list of 4 and 5 star resorts in Las Vegas for those who enjoy the fun and excitement of state of the art gaming activities and a glamorous nightlife.

Two of the favorite vacation spots in America are Hawaii and Florida. You can choose from hundreds of resorts near beautiful beaches and clear blue oceans as well as inland resorts near Disney World and all of the other inland amusement attractions in Orlando. Resort accommodations are condominiums with full kitchens, living areas and up to 4 bedrooms. Perfect for romantic getaways or family vacations. Pricing is normally for 7 nights and 8 days and is at least 75%-80% off of retail.

A large percentage of a travel club’s vacation destination offerings are not available to the public, even through companies such as Travelocity and Expedia. Most memberships pay for themselves from the savings gleaned from taking just one trip. Members of travel clubs enjoy access to timeshare owners’ properties without the expense of purchasing and maintaining the property and without being subject to blackout dates and limited use.

One need not travel to distant lands to experience diversity. America is rich with its own beauty, history, and cuisine. This country is a myriad of diverse cultures which paint the beautiful mosaic we call the United States. Visiting new places within your own country is just as thrilling, exciting, fun and educational as traveling to a foreign country.

Purchasing a travel club membership will open the door for experiencing the vast array of climates, terrains, history and cultures of the many wonderful aspects our beautiful country has to offer.

Using your membership for family vacations will create experiences that you and your children will never forget. Some of my fondest childhood memories are of our family vacations. I wish we could have taken more!

Mary Lou is a member of one of the most successful teams in marketing Global Resorts Network. She and her family travel extensively using their Global Resorts Network exclusive travel membership.

Adventure Travel in Southern Arizona

Southern Arizona Travel

Travel to Southern Arizona if you seek adventure. This dry desolate area has been inhabited by humans for a long time. The climate has made it difficult if not impossible for the area to become over populated. Making the adventurer in all of us smile. There are tales of lost gold mines, cowboys and a desert that goes for miles and miles.

Southern Arizona hiking trails are really off the beaten path. Traveling on dirt road to get to The Superstition Mountains you will find an area that is mountain desert and seems to go on forever. Hike around a bit and you may stumble upon the Lost Dutchman’s Mine. The story goes that a miner brought millions of dollars of gold out of the mountain, never returned to the area and died before telling a living soul where the mine was located.

Located near Yuma, Madera Canyon rises to 8,000 feet and is a great way to hike from the desert to the trees. It can get really cold at this elevation and I would recommend hiking here in the summer months.

Ghost Towns in Southern Arizona can get the imagination running are full of history and fun for young and old. If you have kids tombstone will create a memory your family will not soon forget. Actors reenact the 1900 train robbery of the Wells Fargo Train. It is a little cheezy for adults but kids love it.

Fairbanks is a true ghost town people last lived here in 1970. Fairbanks was once a bustling mining, milling town located along the San Pedro river in Southern Arizona.

Bordered by mesquite forest and grasses this town and short hikes along the perimeter will give you a look back to the Spaniards. You can look at the remains of their settlements here as well. The Nature Conservancy considers this a great place and well worth the visit.

Southern Arizona Vineyards good wine can be found here with the grapes thriving at the 5,000 to 6,000 elevation in the Sonita-Elgin area. Producing a nice Petit Verdot local winemakers man there own tasting rooms. There are 39 licensed wineries in Arizona. This area reminds me of the Napa Valley 35 years ago and is a wine lovers paradise. The busiest time of the year is during the Thanksgiving weekend.

Kartner Caverns, Southern Arizona – the cavern was not discovered until 1974 you can view geological history as it develops in the caverns. The caverns are in pristine condition and have been developed into an Arizona State Park.

The Center For Spiritual Awareness and Personal Evolution

Lovers of the Arts, the Spiritual and New Age enthusiests all come together in Sedona, Arizona.

This colorful, mostly beautiful Red Rock landscape has been referred to by many as, ‘The most beautiful place on earth.’

Now while this is a broad statement the mere fact that so many have made it means there is at least something of interest going on in this Northern Arizona travel destination.

Sedona, Arizona offers a rich mix of jaw dropping scenery, courtesy of the beautiful Red Rocks carefully placed by Mother Nature throughout the Verde Valley that attracts a collection of some of the Southwest’s most talented artists; painters, sculpture, writers as well as followers of all things spiritual and metaphysical.

Combine the magnificent natural beauty Sedona, Arizona is famous for along with the area’s natural centers of positive energy, called vortexes, and your visit to Sedona will be a very elevating experience. It is estimated that perhaps half of the people who live in Sedona are here because it feels so good to be here.

A variety of spiritual and personal growth oriented groups and businesses thrive in the Sedona area bringing with them a diversity of spiritual practices, health, and self-improvement and healing modalities.

Sedona’s Creative Life Center presents programs emphasizing personal growth and development processes, metaphysics and spirituality, consciousness-expansion and creativity enhancement, uplifting musical performances, and alternative approaches to health and well-being.

Those that appreciate fine art can explore the more than forty local art galleries. Sedona is considered to be a premier destination for art lovers from all over the world. Many artists choose to live and create their art in Sedona surrounded by the natural beauty Mother Nature has created. The Sedona Gallery Association represents the collaborative efforts of the premiere galleries in Sedona to ensure that art lovers and artist alike experience the best art environment imaginable. The association provides a unified voice to advance standards of excellence and raise awareness to ensure high quality for all Sedona patrons.

Alternative Healings:
Sedona is a Mecca for alternative healers. Living this close to the beauty of the land has inspired many profoundly holistic approaches to health. Our body-temples are complex multi-dimensional organisms, and Sedona healers apply their gifts to every level of the body/mind/spirit spectrum. You will benefit from their intuitive skills and compassionate hearts as well as their intellectual training and hands-on experience. So, whether you’re currently troubled with health issues — or are simply seeking more wellness, pleasure and balance in your life — a visit to one of these dedicated practitioners could open up new worlds for you.

Spiritual Awakening:
Sedona offers many wonderful guides into the invisible realms of heart, mind and soul. Their approaches vary from cutting-edge technologies like Life Coaching and Human Design, to the ancient arts of Astrology and Shamanism. These guides can help you become more conscious and clear about your secret patterns and motivations. While you’re in Sedona, let them show you how to use the red rocks and the vortex energies to deepen your experience.

The Spirit of the Land:
The natural beauty of Sedona is extraordinary from any perspective, but the closer you get, the deeper your experience will be. Special Sedona guides can transport you through the physical landscape and into the heart of the wild. Let the spirits of the land speak to you. Our Native brothers and sisters are sharing their tribal wisdom, showing us how to live in harmony with the earth and all our relations. Some of the most profound spiritual experiences in Sedona are to be found out on the land.

Sedona Vortexes Made Simple:
Sedona Vortex sites are popular tourist attractions. What are these Sedona vortexes? Vortex sites are enhanced energy locations that facilitate prayer, meditation, mind/body healing, and exploring your relationship with your Soul and the divine. They are neither electric nor magnetic (although these words are often used to describe the vortexes, along with the other nomenclature such as masculine or feminine sites). The explanation for vortexes lies more at the boundaries of known science, rather than in electromagnetic descriptions or gender related labels.

Recently the PBS program Nova, featured a breakthrough in physics called “String Theory” (also known as super-strings) that is revolutionizing all of science on the same order of magnitude that Einstein’s discoveries did in the early 1900’s. The key spiritual implications of Super-Strings are that the world’s top scientists agree that all things exist in a minimum of 10 or more dimensions. Simply stated Vortex sites are locations having energy flows in those deeper dimensions that the Soul can soar on.

Up flow Vortexes (also called electric or masculine sites) have energy flows that help you soar to higher spiritual perspectives. They enhance prayers or meditations for blending with the Universe, feeling one with the divine, or facing a problem from a Soul level. Inflow Vortexes (also called magnetic or feminine) have energy flows that help you go inward. In them you will be more successful with meditations or prayers about your life purposes or how to heal hurts in your past. There are also Combination Vortexes that have aspects of both energies. These allow the seeker to experience more advanced or in depth spiritual skills and meditations.

A wide variety of lectures, texts, and Guides are available through Sedona’s bookstores and Spiritual Centers to assist you in experiencing the power of Sedona’s Vortex sites. Give yourself the gift of tapping Sedona’s potential for spiritual renewal and advancement.

In Arizona Travelers Find Solitude and Connectedness With Satellite Internet

There are many unique places in the continental US to visit or vacation. The American landscape is vast and varied. From the Redwood Forests and Pacific Coastline, to the historical North and Southeast of the country. Each place has a lot of unique attractions to offer, whether it is physical and natural beauty, a rich historical and cultural identity, or exciting adventure tourism attractions. Arguably one of the most unique places in the country, however, is the American Southwest. This part of the country has it all; from the awe inspiring Grand Canyon, to the rich and deep colors of the hills and desert in the setting sun, to the bustling cities in Arizona and New Mexico, to the delicious and spicy foods.

If you haven’t been already, the Southwest is a great place to go for an all-American vacation. Arizona particularly has a lot to offer in terms of natural beauty, while still offering the accessibility and amenities of most big cities in the US. Arizona has recently taken steps to ensure that there is satellite internet access throughout the state. From the desert canyons and Sedona hills to the bustling cities of Flagstaff and Phoenix, Arizona gets fast and reliable internet access. This is possible because of the integration of satellite internet that allows people to connect to the web via satellite signal. This is great for a state like Arizona that has a lot of open space with many smaller towns spread throughout. Satellite internet doesn’t require cables to be grounded for hundreds of miles to reach small towns, you just need a service and a dish. With this advance in connectivity, Arizona is becoming a major tourist attraction.

Aside from the technological advances of satellite internet that make the state an all-around more accessible and connected place for residents and travelers alike, Arizona has something for everyone in terms of travel. Depending upon your interests here are a few travel ideas for how to really enjoy Arizona and the American Southwest.

Visit the Grand Canyon and the Sedona hills. This part of the state is perhaps the most breathtaking and otherworldly. The rich colors of the soil and stone formations mirrored in the setting sun are like no other sight. You can take private group tours to the canyon with the whole family, or if you’re more adventurous you can get a national parks pass and camp in it. The Sedona hills are great to do with a one day car rental or a day tour with a guide. Be sure to pack a picnic or a bottle of wine to toast the sunset.

Go stargazing. The view from an Arizona night sky is unbeatable. Because of the arid climate the nights are often cloudless. As a result also of the well preserved natural beauty, if you can get away from the light pollution of Phoenix the sky will be filled with thousands of stars you never even knew were there. It’s a great idea for a family outing or a romantic drive.

Go golfing. The areas outside of Phoenix as well as Flagstaff offer some of the country’s most premiere golfing resorts. The winds are low, the days are sunny and dry, which make for perfect golfing weather all year round. There have been many new courses popping up around the cities that provide a great escape for the golfing enthusiast, with well manicured greens and attentive staffers.

These are just a few ways to enjoy Arizona at its best. It is a unique place in the US because it boasts some beautiful and well preserved natural sights that can make you feel like you have the whole world to yourself. Juxtaposed with this seeming isolation is the fact that you can be here among the endless deserts and canyons and still be able to get access to the rest of the world via satellite internet. It is a place where you can really have it all, solitude and connectedness.

Arizona Travel Guide – Visit Arizona Missions

The state of Arizona has a beautiful and colorful past that can be witnessed through its historic landmarks. Among these magnificent landmarks are the Missions.

What are missions? Missions are structures built by the first Spanish missionaries or priests to come in the area. They housed the Spanish missionaries who came to spread Christianity in the Americas, and are about two or three centuries old.

How did these missions came about? Well, centuries ago, Spanish priests, particularly a Catholic priest named Father Eusebio Francisco Kino, established more than twenty missions in the area called the Pimeria Alta, which means the upper lands of the Pimian Indians that is now known as Southern Arizona U.S.A and Northern Sonora, Mexico. Unfortunately, due to several factors, only four of those structures have been left intact and these are the San Xavier del Bac Mission, San José de Tumacácori, San Cayetano de Calabazas, and Los Santos Angeles de Guevavi.

Who was Father Eusebio Francisco Kino? Father Kino was born in a small village in Segno, Italy on the 10th of August in the year 1645. Actually, his parents named him Eusebio Francesco Chini, which was later changed to its German version Eusebio Francisco Kino. This change might be because he studied in Austria, a country in which German is the national language. He belonged to a rich family and was sent to a Jesuit school and later on to Hala, near the German border. When he was in his middle teenage years, he got seriously ill. While he was sick, he made a promise to himself that if he survived the illness, he would become a missionary. After he recovered, he fulfilled his vow and became a priest. He was then assigned to help spread Christianity in Mexico in the year 1683. He started building missions across Pimeria Alta from 1687 until his death at Sonora in 1711.

One of the oldest remaining missions in Arizona today is San Xavier del Bac Mission. It is fondly called by some as the “White Dove of the Desert” because of its white facade. It was first built about 3 centuries ago and it is still amazingly beautiful and functional. Even today, it is still used as a church. Years later, San José de Tumacácori and Los Santos Angeles de Guevavi were both built in 1691 while San Cayetano de Calabazas was built in 1756.

Where specifically can these missions be found in Arizona? San Xavier del Bac Mission can be found near the city of Tucson. It is a little over 8 miles from the city. The three other missions can all be found in the Tumacácori National Historical Park in Santa Cruz Valley. The park is also near Tucson and is quite a popular tourist spot. All four Arizona missions are quite popular because of their sheer beauty and historic significance. Hundreds of both devotees and the “simply curious” sort visit these magnificent historic places every day.

Arizona Travel Guide

When you live in the eastern areas of this country, the idea of traveling west can be very exciting. There so many great places that many of us often dream about one day that we would like to see. I’ve always dreamed of being able to go and see the Grand Canyon. I really didn’t think that an Arizona travel guide was necessary, but I’m Sure glad that my husband and I chose to take one along in spite of my lack of interest.

While I knew that this state of Arizona offers some spectacular Grand Canyon views, I had no idea that some of the other wonders can be explored. Until I read through the Arizona travel guide that we took along on a trip. As our guide mentioned, the state is really a big amusement park for adults and kids alike, built of natural wonders and full of fun activities that are suitable for people of all ages.

I love the idea of visiting the state that takes me to another scenic adventure. The State of Arizona travel guide offered a fair amount of information about the towns that seem to take you back to the old days of the West. This romantic idea is accompanied by some of the most up-to-date, luxurious resorts and hotels that you can imagine.

Combining the old and the new is a great way to offer comfort and relaxation while still giving people the amenities that most vacationers crave in this rough and rugged adventure. The sense of adventure as well as some of the important lessons that you can be learned when traveling to the state of Arizona is a benefit that shouldn’t be overlooked.

The Arizona travel guide offers a fair amount of information about man-made railroads, lakes and reservoirs that are certain to be a areas of interest to the average visitor. There are also many organized functions that can offer ways to fill in the empty time while on the trip. You would have a hard time imagining that these will be necessary for most people. The many brilliant museums, dude ranches and other old town areas described in Arizona travel guide makes the idea of staying less than seven days almost an unthinkable thought.

It’s always amazing how one piece of literature can peak so many different areas of interest. Not only am I going to see one of the seven wonders of the world I’m also going to have a number of other memorable experiences on my trip to Arizona.

I’m really looking forward to fulfilling some of my childhood dreams of finally being able to go see the Grand Canyon and enjoy the surrounding scenery. After reading through the majority of the Arizona travel guide I have come to the realization that there are so many things in this state that can be hard to see on just one trip.